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AFV Painting & Weathering
Answers to questions about the right paint scheme or tips for the right effect.
Weathering
Namabiiru
#399
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Rhode Island, United States
Joined: March 05, 2014
KitMaker: 2,426 posts
Armorama: 1,656 posts
Posted: Monday, April 16, 2018 - 04:56 AM UTC
I would tend to agree it is a bit heavy, although you've focused on the correct places.

Armorsmith
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Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: April 09, 2015
KitMaker: 825 posts
Armorama: 787 posts
Posted: Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 12:59 PM UTC
The rust and chipping in my opinion are rather overdone, although you seem to have done a good job with the effect.
TheLilPeashooter
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Hong Kong S.A.R. / 繁體
Joined: March 04, 2018
KitMaker: 35 posts
Armorama: 27 posts
Posted: Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 02:50 AM UTC
After a few YouTube vids, namely Andy Hobby HQ, I came up with this.



Any constructive feedbacks are welcome

Edit: sorry for photo size.
GeraldOwens
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Florida, United States
Joined: March 30, 2006
KitMaker: 3,401 posts
Armorama: 3,362 posts
Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 - 12:28 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Hello everyone! A beginner question - I always seem to struggle in weathering. Most times it is too much and the entire model looks unrealistic and downright horrid. Are there any simple weathering techniques that will improve the look? I'm not making abandoned vehicles but simply some light weathering to buff the look.

Ps. lack an airbrush (I stick to spray paint).

Thanks in advance



Nearly all the weathering techniques used with oil paints and enamels can also be done using artists watercolors (with a little flow enhancer or dish detergent to prevent beading).
You can experiment safely, and if you don't like an effect, you can just rinse it off and start over. When you like something, just overspray with clear flat to make it permanent.
Bravo36
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Arizona, United States
Joined: January 11, 2002
KitMaker: 145 posts
Armorama: 129 posts
Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 - 10:44 AM UTC
Search YouTube, there are dozens of great instructional videos from GREAT modelers on there. Watch a few and try the techniques that look best to you.
Tojo72
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New Jersey, United States
Joined: June 06, 2006
KitMaker: 4,357 posts
Armorama: 3,298 posts
Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 - 08:40 AM UTC
A simple dusting of earth colored pigments on running gear,tracks,surfaces is a simple way of imparting some subtle weatheting.Mig Ammo and AK are some manufacturers that have a wide variety of colors.
Removed by original poster on 04/13/18 - 21:35:55 (GMT).
srmalloy
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United States
Joined: April 15, 2012
KitMaker: 314 posts
Armorama: 279 posts
Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 - 07:33 AM UTC
Another recommendation I've seen a number of times that seems to give more 'real' appearances -- the weathering of real vehicles didn't happen all at once; if you can take the time, don't do it all at once. Think about how the vehicle was used to build up the weathering you want, and follow that usage when weathering. For example, some scratches in the paint, then some dust/mud as it's driven around, and then more scratches that cut through some of the mud as well as the paint. I see much the same recommendation in model railroading, particularly with the way markings get overpainted as rolling stock changes hands or is repurposed.
Namabiiru
#399
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Rhode Island, United States
Joined: March 05, 2014
KitMaker: 2,426 posts
Armorama: 1,656 posts
Posted: Thursday, April 12, 2018 - 06:49 AM UTC
There are so many different techniques of varying complexity out there it's almost impossible to single anything out, but I think Joseph is right that washes and filters will be among the first techniques you'll want to learn.

I think I would say the three most important things to consider are this:

1) Experiment with different techniques and different combinations of techniques until you find the ones that work for YOU. Everyone has different styles, so there is no one-size-fits-all approach to weathering.

2) There are thousands of tutorials on the internet and in books and magazines. Do loss of research, experiment with new things and don't be afraid of the error part of trial and error.

3) As a general rule, unless you are representing a totally derelict hulk (which requires true weathering mastery IMHO), less is more. It's way too easy to over-do it, and I think that is a about the biggest contributor to an unsuccessful weathering job. If you think you just need to add a few more chips and scratches here and there, you've probably already got too many.

4) Because nobody expects the Spanish inquisition!) Practice, practice, practice.

Good luck!

BravoTwoZero
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California, United States
Joined: June 11, 2009
KitMaker: 205 posts
Armorama: 125 posts
Posted: Thursday, April 12, 2018 - 04:03 AM UTC
I've been trying different weathering techniques. In my opinion,the ones that are subtle yet effective are: pin washes and filters. For me, these two elevates a finished model from a "toy" to a good looking model.
TheLilPeashooter
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Hong Kong S.A.R. / 繁體
Joined: March 04, 2018
KitMaker: 35 posts
Armorama: 27 posts
Posted: Thursday, April 12, 2018 - 03:29 AM UTC
Hello everyone! A beginner question - I always seem to struggle in weathering. Most times it is too much and the entire model looks unrealistic and downright horrid. Are there any simple weathering techniques that will improve the look? I'm not making abandoned vehicles but simply some light weathering to buff the look.

Ps. lack an airbrush (I stick to spray paint).

Thanks in advance