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AFV Painting & Weathering
Answers to questions about the right paint scheme or tips for the right effect.
Advice on Spray Painting.
KyrasMoonhunter
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Missouri, United States
Joined: March 20, 2015
KitMaker: 9 posts
Armorama: 6 posts
Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 - 03:13 PM UTC
The title says a good portion of it, but what it comes down to is painting 1/72 Scale AFV. I don't have the space or money for an Airbrush set, and while I love brush painting, I'm curious about the usage of spray paints.

A few people I know have made mention of the usefulness of Krylon's Camo paints, and some of their others. Will it work though? I want to do a T-34 Model 1941, spray paint it and then touch up with brush paints to get the desired effect, and then some weathering. What say you? Anyone have experience with this?

Extra Note: I'm not looking to win any awards, I just want them to look good for random photos and other small uses.
TopSmith
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Washington, United States
Joined: August 09, 2002
KitMaker: 1,061 posts
Armorama: 1,005 posts
Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 - 04:42 PM UTC
It would work but the color choice might not be accurate.
Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 1,979 posts
Armorama: 986 posts
Posted: Saturday, August 11, 2018 - 03:16 AM UTC
The problem with using spray cans for 1/72 scale is the spray pattern. You'd probably be better off using the short Testor's spray cans rather than the full sized Krylon (or other brand) paint cans. You might even find the mix of available colors is better since they've been formulated for painting models, and thier small size makes them easier to control. The best practices to apply while using spray cans is to gently heat the can in warm water (don't heat it on the stove, just run it under hot tap water, this will pressurize the can). Shake it well to mix the paint and propellant thoroughly, and apply the paint in several light "mist" coats, holding the can 12-18 inches above the model, allowing the paint to dry between coats. Try not to start or stop the paint flow above the model, since this can cause splatters of paint where you don't want them-- rather, start your painting pass before getting over the model and end it after you pass over it. I like to paint on a large piece of cardboard with the model "anchored" by a strip or two of double backed tape. I can then angle the model for better coverage. Spray cans have thier limits, you should really consider an airbrush and compressor at some point for better variety, style, and less waste, but with proper technique and masking, along with practice, you can accomplish some nice work with a spray can. You can get a "good" airbrush set and an adequate compressor that wil fit into the space of a large shoebox (both Tamiya and Iwata offer these) and the paint pattern will be far less than a spray can, so space shouldn't really be a limiting factor. Good luck!
VR, Russ
11Bravo_C2
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Texas, United States
Joined: May 12, 2015
KitMaker: 408 posts
Armorama: 339 posts
Posted: Saturday, August 11, 2018 - 03:49 AM UTC
IMO, the color range of Krylon spray cans is not anywhere near the range of WWII or Modern AFV colors. Scale will also be an issue, especially at 1/72.

I know you said you're not trying to win awards, but geez, you're going to be looking at the model almost daily and thinking, "That color is way off".

If you are set in using Krylon then follow Russ' advise.

KyrasMoonhunter
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Missouri, United States
Joined: March 20, 2015
KitMaker: 9 posts
Armorama: 6 posts
Posted: Sunday, August 12, 2018 - 03:43 PM UTC
You all have some good points, though two I'm not quite understanding. Paint pattern is similar to the concept of brush strokes right? If that is the case, it makes sense, but with a bit of experience I have with spray paints and tricks I've picked up from priming, I've never noticed any. I could be mistaking it though, and feel free to correct me, its only a good day if you learn something after all.

The only mention is about color, and that being range and it looking off later. So what is the proper color for a Russian T-34? I have two painted with a mix of Vallejo and P3 paints and both are in the middle of dark pine, and light forest greens. Pictures in books, and images of recently restored/recovered vehicles show a range of light woodland, to olive drab up to a near pine green.

Side question, if that is okay, are Tamiya's brush paints work it, or should I stick with Vallejo? My local store only has the Tamiya Brush paints for that company but various Vallejo types.
smorko
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Serbia & Montenegro
Joined: March 11, 2013
KitMaker: 66 posts
Armorama: 62 posts
Posted: Sunday, August 12, 2018 - 09:03 PM UTC
I never had luck brushing tamiya paints, maybe small details but not large areas. It tends to stick and skin over easily so repeated passes when brushing actually take off paint. Aparently it needs some specific thinning procedure to work. It sprays beautifully though.

As for sprays, try to mist and move quickly over the model, rotating it while you do so. It is difficult to get all the nooks and crannies, but the main issue is thick paint layers that can obscure detail, especially in 1/72. Also sprays tend to have an unnatural sheen that makes models look toy like.
Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 1,979 posts
Armorama: 986 posts
Posted: Monday, August 13, 2018 - 04:16 AM UTC
Paint Pattern for spray cans— it’s the difference between a heavy wide spray and a fine delicate spray. Many of the commercial brands (like Krylon) are designed for wider applications of paint, and contain more aerosol and paint in the can. The smaller Testors brand cans are designed for smaller applications of paint, and contain less pressurization, making them better for smaller applications. The droplet size and density can be an issue with the more commercial types f paint as well, so you may get larger "splatters" of droplets towards the outside of your spray pattern.

Formulation — the commercial grade paints often contain different formulationsor mixtures of paint to aerosol, this gives much heavier applications of paint in a smaller area— not really good for fine details as in 1/72 scale vehicles

Tamiya paints for brushing — I’ve found Tamiya paints will brush well if properly thinned- the thinner the better, but you’ll need to experiment. The key is keeping the paint "wet" as Tamiya tends to dry quickly. I usually use a nylon six-depression "pallet" type of paint dish, with the paint in one small depression and Tamiya thinner in another, with a third pallet open for paint mixing. One nice thing about Tamiya paints is they can be re-mixed pretty well even when dry. I will brush on thin coats, building then to get the shade I want.

VR, Russ
SoftskinFan
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Georgia, United States
Joined: January 30, 2017
KitMaker: 64 posts
Armorama: 57 posts
Posted: Monday, August 13, 2018 - 09:13 AM UTC
I have not made the leap to an airbrush yet, either. I use Tamiya spray cans almost exclusively, and while expensive, they have a nice spray pattern, are consistent, and there is a broad range of colors. Tamiya is not available everywhere, but mail order is always an option, I guess. There were SEVERAL times on my latest model where I wished I could have had the tight control/pattern of an airbrush, though. I ended up doing a lot of masking, and you do waste a fair amount of paint. Just my 2 cents.
Gary
Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 1,979 posts
Armorama: 986 posts
Posted: Tuesday, August 14, 2018 - 02:50 AM UTC
You're in luck!!! Or the proverbial "Ask and ye shall receive"!!! These "rattle can diffusers" from AK just popped up on Aeroscale today! They look like they will change the pattern and flow rates of aerosol paint cans to produce different paint effects. Not sure if they will fit any rattle cans, but they look like they will probably fit Testor's and Tamiya cans. It would be nice to see a review "in action" of these on the site. They may be very helpful for those folks who don't have an airbrush:

https://armorama.kitmaker.net/modules.php?op=modload&name=SquawkBox&file=index&req=viewtopic&topic_id=270917

VR, Russ
Scarred
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Washington, United States
Joined: March 11, 2016
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Posted: Tuesday, August 14, 2018 - 03:26 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I have not made the leap to an airbrush yet, either. I use Tamiya spray cans almost exclusively, and while expensive, they have a nice spray pattern, are consistent, and there is a broad range of colors. Tamiya is not available everywhere, but mail order is always an option, I guess. There were SEVERAL times on my latest model where I wished I could have had the tight control/pattern of an airbrush, though. I ended up doing a lot of masking, and you do waste a fair amount of paint. Just my 2 cents.
Gary




Even with an airbrush you are going to do a lot of masking unless you can free hand a pattern like MERDC camo. I've been thinking about doing a camo pattern like British Urban in Berlin on an Abrams decked out for fighting in a city like NYC but mainly in shades of concrete and asphalt (no 50 shades of grey jokes please). I got an excellent airbrush, a large compressor and I know I'll be masking like a mad man. I've freehanded camo but the edges always always seemed too 'soft' at scale. Especially on 1/72 scale aircraft.