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Built Review
172
Glaeser Steyr Cabrio
Glaeser Steyr Cabrio
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by: Andras [ SPONGYA ]

Introduction

The Steyr 100/200 Cabrio was a small, relatively fast (100km/h) car built by the Austrian manufacturer Steyr-Daimler-Puch AG from 1934 to 1940. I donít know much about cars (most of my knowledge comes from Top Gear), so I canít pretend I am an expert; this review focuses on the quality of the kit itself.

Contents

The model comes in the typical Hunor cardboard box- a pretty sturdy box that protects the fragile resin parts from damage. The individual parts are in Ziploc bags, with some packing peanuts thrown in. The PE fret is quite small, so to avoid it being misplaced, it is attached to the instruction manual with cellotape.

Review

The model is very small; the chassis and the undercarriage/seat come as individual pieces. Once you clean them off, they snap together; the fit is so good you donít even need to use glue. The model is quite simple to assemble as the number of parts is small; we get four wheels, two alternate parts for the canvas top (one erected, one folded), and thatís pretty much it. There is a casting error on the folding canvas top; generally the quality of resin is good. The chassis has some really fine engraved lines depicting doors, panels, etc. The windscreen frame, the steering wheel and the stick for the manual transmission come as PE parts; you will need fine tweezers to handle them. The driverís rear view mirror is missing; probably because it would be a very tiny part indeed. There are no clear parts provided, but in this scale I would not use them anyway. (Difficult to make realistic 1/72nd scale glass panels.) Due to the small scale the leaf spring suspension is not depicted, either; it would be hidden in any case.

The only issue I could find was the Steyr text on the radiator grilles; since the letters are only slightly raised details (and they are quite soft) it will be difficult to paint them well. Perhaps undercoating the grilles with silver and using a heavy black wash might be a solution. Iím not sure what the alternative would have been though; I think it would be equally difficult to deal with a tiny PE part instead.

The whole assembly including cutting the parts off the pouring block and cleaning them up took about an hour.

Conclusion

Itís an unusual (for me) kit of a really nice looking old car. While I do not know much about antique cars, it certainly is a good addition if you want to depict a civilian setting, use it as a staff car, add some ďreal lifeĒ details to dioramas, or simply want to build a small version of a cool-looking little car.
SUMMARY
Highs: An interesting subject and well engineered kit.
Lows: Somewhat soft details on the front grille, casting error.
Verdict: Recommended.
Percentage Rating
83%
  Scale: 1:72
  Mfg. ID: 720150
  PUBLISHED: Dec 12, 2016
  NATIONALITY: Austria
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 85.05%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 82.63%

About Andras (spongya)
FROM: BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

I am a biologist by trade, and as a hobby I've been building scale models for the last twenty years. Recently I started to write reviews of the models I bought. These reviews are written from the point of view of an average model builder; hence the focus is on quality of the model, how easy it is to...

Copyright ©2019 text by Andras [ SPONGYA ]. All rights reserved.



Comments

Perhaps not exactly the same car: 1938 Steyr 220 (As seen at the 2013 Keeneland, Kentucky Concours d'Elegance) (Photos copyright 2013 Michael Koenig)
DEC 12, 2016 - 01:40 AM
One more photo of the Steyr from my collection: An absolutely beautiful restoration! Pre-to early WWII car-art at its finest.
DEC 12, 2016 - 06:59 AM
Fantastic looking car, looks like something from one of Tintin's earlier adventures. Review goes along with experience of a Hunor truck I made, one or two moulding blemishes, but accuracy of fit absolutely spot on. Good luck, Andras, with getting a nice shiny finish on those beautiful curved body panels... I've come to realise painting cars is very different to painting AFVs.
DEC 12, 2016 - 04:48 PM
Dear Michael, I could not decide exactly which type this is- the differences are small and not necessarily visible (engine upgrade, etc.) Nevertheless, these versions look close enough not to matter. I really appreciate the reference photos; they are gorgeous. I think I know what I'll spend my lotto winnings on. Dear Matt, Thank you for the kind words I'll be posting photos of the finished car somewhere -I guess carmorama (:D), or my blog... but yeah, getting a smooth, shiny finish that does not look artificial is going to be a problem. I guess polishing will be part of the process.
DEC 13, 2016 - 03:22 AM
   

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