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AFV Painting & Weathering
Answers to questions about the right paint scheme or tips for the right effect.
Best paint for hand brushing?
cgilson
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Texas, United States
Joined: April 27, 2014
KitMaker: 2 posts
Armorama: 2 posts
Posted: Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 06:19 AM UTC
Try Warship Hobbies on Ebay for White Ensign paints - both ships and armor.
Or try website at www.warshiphobbies.com
Good luck
Simple64
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New South Wales, Australia
Joined: January 13, 2008
KitMaker: 33 posts
Armorama: 33 posts
Posted: Thursday, May 01, 2014 - 09:23 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Vallejo. Brush, air, effects, that's all you need . Vallejo.



I am having trouble with my Vallejo paint. It paints beautifully but it does not stick very well & is very fragile as it can be easily scratched off.
I am painting some resin British tank crew figures & they have been undercoated with Tamiya fine grey primer which was left to dry for a week.
Any help would be appreciated.
Venko555
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Bulgaria
Joined: December 07, 2013
KitMaker: 908 posts
Armorama: 698 posts
Posted: Thursday, May 01, 2014 - 10:59 PM UTC
I'm using Vallejo colors since a while and have positive experience. Now I'm painting some resin figures, primed and lot of handling with bare hands, no scratches, peeling etc. I can handle the figures after 10-15 minutes of drying with no fingerprints. Of course wearing latex gloves are recommended

Regards
jkim215
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Alabama, United States
Joined: December 14, 2014
KitMaker: 5 posts
Armorama: 1 posts
Posted: Monday, January 26, 2015 - 11:56 PM UTC
As for many people here my favourite are Vallejo paints. It really won't let you down. I can surely recommend it to you.
Biggles2
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Quebec, Canada
Joined: January 01, 2004
KitMaker: 7,600 posts
Armorama: 6,110 posts
Posted: Thursday, May 07, 2015 - 08:09 PM UTC
I also prefer Citadel acrylic paints for hand brushing in general, and figure painting in particular. They're for fantasy war-gaming miniatures, but don't let that fool you - they work equally well on military figures, and even armor kits. They're thick and creamy, and require considerable thinning, so last a long time. Also, the paint doesn't lose it's quality when thinned a lot. Unused portions are also easy to pour back into the wide-mouthed bottles - unlike Vallejo and Andrea squeeze bottles. Citadel acrylics are high quality, and work best thinned with ordinary tap water.
johnsmith1966
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United States
Joined: May 15, 2016
KitMaker: 4 posts
Armorama: 3 posts
Posted: Sunday, May 15, 2016 - 11:24 AM UTC
I prefer Vallejo model color or citadel. great stuff.
j76lr
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New Jersey, United States
Joined: September 22, 2006
KitMaker: 1,081 posts
Armorama: 1,066 posts
Posted: Thursday, August 04, 2016 - 02:33 AM UTC
I don't hand paint often ,just on small details , but Polly O used to be good .
slug955
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United Kingdom
Joined: November 10, 2013
KitMaker: 195 posts
Armorama: 175 posts
Posted: Thursday, August 04, 2016 - 03:27 AM UTC
Just to be different I like Lifecolor. I find it to be a better coverage to Vallejo which are good...
mmeier
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Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
Joined: October 22, 2008
KitMaker: 1,280 posts
Armorama: 1,015 posts
Posted: Thursday, August 04, 2016 - 03:39 AM UTC
ebergerud: Did Revell finally fix their "cluster bomb" approach to quality with the Aquas? I tried them a few years ago when they where rather new and it was "Hit, Miss, Miss, maybe a hit" with thinning (even using the original Revell stuff) and do not get me started on airbrushing (They are rated for that as well). Brush-Painting at least worked sometimes, airbrush was "clogging, clogging, clogging, to thin"

I would love to switch since they are easily available here in germany, are nicely priced and have a beautiful RAL6014 (Gelboliv - a must for late 1950s- mid 1980s Bundeswehr vehicles). But even two containers of the same color did not behave the same on trials. Same for the paint consistency anywhere from "goo" to "almost liquid".

Svarttjern
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Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
Joined: October 10, 2016
KitMaker: 12 posts
Armorama: 1 posts
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 11:29 PM UTC
No they didn't, I started building a few weeks ago and of course used Revell Aqua because they're easy to get. But other than the Blacks which are actually not bad the rest just feels like I either put water or Putty on my models.
zorrolobo
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Distrito Federal, Mexico
Joined: May 31, 2013
KitMaker: 1,454 posts
Armorama: 1,437 posts
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 11:38 PM UTC
I agree with Vallejo. Best paint I have ever used.
wildbill426
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Connecticut, United States
Joined: December 08, 2006
KitMaker: 399 posts
Armorama: 374 posts
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 11:39 PM UTC
Just another vote for Vallejo. It used to be Tamiya, but the 'V' passed 'em out.
Vicious
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Queensland, Australia
Joined: September 04, 2015
KitMaker: 1,515 posts
Armorama: 1,107 posts
Posted: Friday, October 28, 2016 - 01:29 AM UTC
Humbrol Enamel forever....

Acrilics Life Color...
fsinan
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Turkey / Türkçe
Joined: January 12, 2017
KitMaker: 3 posts
Armorama: 3 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 03:56 PM UTC
Hi folks. I'm new here. Such a nice source for brushing technique. I want to paint my sdkfz.222 with brush and I have only Tamiya acrylic paints and Tamiya brush. I have some questions;

What is the thinner ratio for Tamiya acrylics while painting with brush?
How do u apply matt and gloss clear coats with brush?
CMOT
Staff MemberEditor-in-Chief
ARMORAMA
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England - South West, United Kingdom
Joined: May 14, 2006
KitMaker: 10,951 posts
Armorama: 8,571 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 05:24 PM UTC
I would say roughly 50/50 but there will be some variation depending on the colours and pigment load in each colour. While brush painting with Tamiya paint is possible I would look at a better suited product your model. If you were airbrushing the model Tamiya paint is excellent.
fsinan
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Turkey / Türkçe
Joined: January 12, 2017
KitMaker: 3 posts
Armorama: 3 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 06:33 PM UTC
Vallejo available here too. But I have a quiet stock of Tamiya cause of airbrushing. But I wanted to try out some handbrushing for my Sdkfz.222.

What about clear coats? Same?
CMOT
Staff MemberEditor-in-Chief
ARMORAMA
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England - South West, United Kingdom
Joined: May 14, 2006
KitMaker: 10,951 posts
Armorama: 8,571 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 08:53 PM UTC
Give Tamiya rattle cans a try when it comes to the clear coats. but you need to remember each modeller has their own favourites.
pzkw
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United States
Joined: May 05, 2003
KitMaker: 50 posts
Armorama: 34 posts
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 03:34 PM UTC
Since this question was posted a long time ago, I'm sure it's been answered many times, but here's my two cents: on my current build, I've switched from using enamel paints to acrylics (primarily using Tamiya, but also have some Model Master). For my brushes, I've been using a #7 round sable for large areas and a 3/0 round sable for details/small parts. One thing I like about using a round brush, is that the tip can be shaped into a point, or a chisel edge. The chisel edge comes in handy when trying to paint along a straight edge (similar to a painter's sash brush).

With the paints, I haven't had much trouble with brush marks.
George587
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Massachusetts, United States
Joined: September 06, 2016
KitMaker: 14 posts
Armorama: 11 posts
Posted: Monday, April 24, 2017 - 03:47 AM UTC
In over 30 years of modeling nothing brushes for me like Humbrol enamels. They are nearly opaque. I understand that they can be difficult to find. Luckily I still have a LHS, remember those, who unbelievably has the whole range and for $2.50 a tin.

I've never been able to hand brush Tamiya Acrylics on any flat surface over a 1/2 inch without roll up. Although I love them for A/B.
Barrikadyzavod
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Barcelona, Spain / España
Joined: May 15, 2015
KitMaker: 21 posts
Armorama: 21 posts
Posted: Tuesday, October 03, 2017 - 01:16 PM UTC
Check the Model Color range by Acrylicos Vallejo, the best option for hand brush paint option...
http://cdn.acrylicosvallejo.com/2f3091938c6b7afb2c1b953bf6a1d8b2/CC070-Rev14.pdf
Best regards
Trisaw
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California, United States
Joined: December 24, 2002
KitMaker: 4,105 posts
Armorama: 2,492 posts
Posted: Thursday, October 26, 2017 - 09:55 PM UTC
I too agree that Vallejos are the best paints to use for acrylic handbrushing.

I have Scale75 paints, and while the colors are nice, I find that the Scale75 bottles are sealed shut so one has to poke a hole to open the eyedropper. The other issue I have with Scale75 paints is that they're filled to the top of the bottle, meaning there's almost no room to shake them up to mix the paint, hence they don't cover very well even after stirring the paint in the palette with a toothpick.

Vallejos cover in one coat whereas Scale75s require a few coats.

Most online hobby shops have sales every weekend or month (and especially at holidays and Christmas) so one can save a lot of money buying paint at those times.

Having excellent brushes is a must. I used to take the 40-50% off art store coupons (Michaels) and buy brushes on the cheap...no more. Buy sable brushes from the United Kingdom...a five-brush set could be had for $20-$25USD ($4-$5 a brush) and they work wonders compared to the cheap art store brushes, not to mention that they last a long time. Horrible cheap brushes obviously produce bad painting results and it has taken me literally years to learn this...don't bother with (cheap) art store brushes to paint figures and kits and use those art store brushes for groundwork instead.

Also buy Brush Soap to clean your brushes. Most brushes are ruined because paint dries up by the ferrule and clump up the bristles. Brush soap will dissolve all those dried paint clumps and return the bristles to "like new" condition.
smorko
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Serbia & Montenegro
Joined: March 11, 2013
KitMaker: 94 posts
Armorama: 89 posts
Posted: Thursday, October 26, 2017 - 11:57 PM UTC

Quoted Text

No they didn't, I started building a few weeks ago and of course used Revell Aqua because they're easy to get. But other than the Blacks which are actually not bad the rest just feels like I either put water or Putty on my models.


I had only good results with revell aqua, they need thinning with water to brush, stirring with one of those battery stirrers helps a lot. For airbrushing I use ethanol to thin and I get great results although it seems to "fade" the paint a bit. No clogging issues whatsoever.
naimbrain
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United Kingdom
Joined: March 15, 2010
KitMaker: 123 posts
Armorama: 118 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 18, 2018 - 05:02 AM UTC
I've tried them all over the years and now prefer Citadel paints thinned with their own Lahmian Medium. It's a tactile joy to brush with and gives superb control. I usually thin anywhere from two parts Lahmian to one part paint for semi opaque coats right up to 10-15 parts Lahmian to one part paint for subtle shades and glazes. Even thinning to those extremes gives consistently excellent results. Yes you have to brush on multiple coats for opaque coverage (note that their 'base' paints cover better) but the Lahmian gives a super smooth finish and the resultant thin coats dry very fast. The colour range is brighter and more vibrant than normal military shades so you will need to start practicing mixing and blending techniques but I've found that this eventually leads to far greater confidence with use of shade and colour. As an example I recently base coated a braille scale Churchill tank with an approximation of OD that once dried looked way too blue. No probs, I quickly mixed up a 15/1 yellow glaze and brushed on successive coats until I'd adjusted the yellow saturation to exactly the colour I wanted, and in doing so also achieved a nicely varied non-uniform finish. With the fast drying time the whole process was completed in minutes. If you find brush painting a constant joy then stick with what you know, but if it feels like you are always fighting to achieve a good finish then it's time to experiment. Brush painting is a very personal skill hence different paints will work better for different people so you will need to experiment to find the answer that is best for you. It might take a while but you will learn so much along the way... Enjoy the journey!!
Mrclark7
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Texas, United States
Joined: June 04, 2017
KitMaker: 495 posts
Armorama: 471 posts
Posted: Wednesday, July 17, 2019 - 05:35 PM UTC
I have just in the last two years gotten back into modeling. I have a large collection of vallejo. Its my go to color for all airbrushing. however the vallejo that I have used thats not for airbrushing I do not feel is painting objects on vehicles good at all. I cant help remember using Humbrol as a kid and it always worked much better. I used to always take a tooth pic and grab the thicker part of the paint and put it onto a towel. then paint directly off the tooth pic and towel. Always seemed to work much better than any of the luck I am having with hand brushing valleo right now.
PzDave
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United States
Joined: November 28, 2012
KitMaker: 319 posts
Armorama: 285 posts
Posted: Wednesday, July 17, 2019 - 07:33 PM UTC
I am old school to the max. I have used Humbrol. Thinned down of course. Having said that Humbrol is out of business! Michaels sells an acrylic flat water based paint. They have the basic colors, brown green, etc. The green is a match for russian armor green. The price was less than a dollar a bottle. Model Master is my other choice for hand brushing.