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World War II
Discuss WWII and the era directly before and after the war from 1935-1949.
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REVIEW
Gerhard Barkhorn
betheyn
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AEROSCALE
#019
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England - South East, United Kingdom
Joined: October 14, 2004
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Posted: Sunday, September 21, 2014 - 07:04 PM UTC
Darren Baker takes a look at ''The Forgotten Ace Fighter Pilot Gerhard Barkhorn'', one of the latest releases from Luftfahrtverlag Start, telling the life story of Gerhard Barkhorn.

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Thanks!
BlackWidow
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Posted: Monday, September 22, 2014 - 06:45 AM UTC
Darren, thanks for the review. I've also got this book a few weeks ago and I'm really thrilled by all these fantastic and so sharp and clear photos. The colour photos Barkhorn took of his comrades machines while flying his own are unique in my eyes.
But the title of the book is a bit irritating, I think. He surely always stands in the shade of his friend Erich Hartmann, but he is not forgotten, not to those for whom this book is made for and not to us who are modellers and interested in the history of WW 2.
The price of 54 Euros is surely not cheap, but if you are thinking about buying it, don't hesitate. Like all books of Luftfahrtverlag Start it is a limited edition and it's worth every cent, believe me.
So sad that Gerhard Barkhorn had to leave us way too early. But I've also got both new decal sheets, so next year will leave some Barkhorn One-O-Nines my workbench, I promise. A good chance to remember him.

Happy modelling!
Torsten
CMOT
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Posted: Monday, September 22, 2014 - 07:41 AM UTC
The thing I like most about this type of book is that it does not glorify war and you can see the man rather than the regime.