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General Ship Modeling
Discuss modeling techniques, experiences, and ship modeling in general.
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Lightship 112 WWII Examination Ship
TRM5150
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Massachusetts, United States
Joined: January 03, 2010
KitMaker: 2,159 posts
Armorama: 707 posts
Posted: Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 09:49 AM UTC
Mike Maynard shares his original conversion of Pyro''s Nantucket Light Ship kit with his Lightship 112 "NANTUCKET" WWII Examination Ship.

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If you have comments or questions please post them here.

Thanks!
Aurora-7
#360
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Connecticut, United States
Joined: June 18, 2003
KitMaker: 1,020 posts
Armorama: 131 posts
Posted: Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 03:00 PM UTC
Wonderful work, Mike. A very interesting subject and example of bringing and old kit to life.
CaptSonghouse
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California, United States
Joined: August 08, 2008
KitMaker: 1,274 posts
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Posted: Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 10:41 PM UTC
What a spectacular conversion, Mike! This is really a wonderful gap-filler in wartime naval topics. Where did you get the deck gun on the stern?

--Karl
superchief
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Rhode Island, United States
Joined: December 14, 2006
KitMaker: 21 posts
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Posted: Friday, August 14, 2015 - 07:24 AM UTC
Mike P.
Thanks for the nice comment. The actual ship, in it's lifetime, underwent numerous modifications, some are very subtle and are easy to apply to the model to make it different from the typical build. For example the hull, masts, small boats, and vent funnels were painted red at one time. If you look at the red version I built, you'll see pipe gussets on the bow bulworks, and a canopy frame back aft. It's a great model to improve upon!
superchief
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Rhode Island, United States
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Posted: Friday, August 14, 2015 - 07:33 AM UTC
Karl
Thank you for the compliment. The gun is scratch built from brass tubing and soldered together. The gun upper base is a lamp finial with a slot cut in to accept the barrel. The lower portion of the base is a piece of brass tubing and a port hole to form a flange base. The other pieces are scrap bits of brass from the junk pile. The training wheel is from a HO model brake wheel. If you can solder, you can build this gun, in any scale, it's pretty generic in appearence. You can also build this out of Evergreen plastic tubing and plastic strips and shapes. Cheers!
CaptSonghouse
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California, United States
Joined: August 08, 2008
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Posted: Friday, August 14, 2015 - 10:07 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Karl
...you can build this gun, in any scale, it's pretty generic in appearence. You can also build this out of Evergreen plastic tubing and plastic strips and shapes. Cheers!



That's cool. The nice thing about modeling naval caliber guns is that they usually have the same proportions, so you can scale-jump from one to size to another. I've even employed artists' brush handles to portray the eight-inch guns on the Lexington in 1:48!

--Karl
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
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Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,772 posts
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Posted: Saturday, August 15, 2015 - 12:21 AM UTC
Mike: wow! You made the ol' girl look great! Super job.
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
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Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
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Posted: Saturday, August 15, 2015 - 12:23 AM UTC
Never heard of this kit but now I want one
superchief
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Rhode Island, United States
Joined: December 14, 2006
KitMaker: 21 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, August 18, 2015 - 03:33 AM UTC
Fredrick
Thank you for the kind words. It's a neat kit and goes together well right out of the box. Plus there is always room for extra detailing if one has the mind to!