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AFV Painting & Weathering
Answers to questions about the right paint scheme or tips for the right effect.
Summer Verdant Merdc Try out
Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 3,493 posts
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Posted: Sunday, January 13, 2019 - 09:19 AM UTC

Quoted Text



Added in the decal..and they look really out of place...but I guess there must be reasons for it to be so big with "an out of place color" or maybe it was peace time training in Germany ? Can those who serve during the "Exercise Reforger" time frame share the reason for the non tactical marking ?




The "decal" as you put it was actually a paper (early) or Vinyl (late) square panel that was issued to units before Reforger or other major exercises. It was commonly taped to the turret or vehicle sides and the front of the glacis, hood or doors. The number identified a numerical specific designation for the unit (other than the units actual designation), and the color of the panel designated the unit as either a member of the "blue" or "orange" army. These were used by umpires and controllers to "officiate" the training. Umpire vehicles used a white panel as I recall (but it's been a while-- so my memory may be a bit faulty here). Depending on where in the world you were and what exercise you might be in, there have been variations in panel sizes and types (triangles and circles have also been used in other locations outside Europe). These number "boxes" were prepared and issued through the Training Aid Support Center (TASC) at the installation or unit level. They were supposed to be collected up after the exercise for future use, but were often just tossed (or kept as a souvenir). Typically, they were attached to the vehicle with "100 Mile an hour" tape --what we know today as OD green duct tape. In later years, strips of Velcro tape have been used to attach both the MILES gear (a laser training aid targeting system) and these panels. "513" would be an identifier for some armored unit (either at company, Troop, Squadron or or Battalion level, and would be used to make assessments in attrition and combat strength during an exercise. Umpires and exercise controllers would keep corresponding score sheets as unit controllers would assess the effects of training simulated action or "events" for opposing units. One common trait of using this "stick on system was that the adhesive on the 100 MPH tape would stick to the vehicle long after the panel was removed, leaving an odd square or rectangle of sticky residue which attracted dirt-- making the area rather distinctive. Hope this helps explain it.
VR, Russ
AgentG
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Nevada, United States
Joined: December 21, 2008
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Posted: Sunday, January 13, 2019 - 09:21 AM UTC


G
mikado
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Singapore / 新加坡
Joined: July 10, 2005
KitMaker: 328 posts
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Posted: Sunday, January 13, 2019 - 12:56 PM UTC

Quoted Text


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Added in the decal..and they look really out of place...but I guess there must be reasons for it to be so big with "an out of place color" or maybe it was peace time training in Germany ? Can those who serve during the "Exercise Reforger" time frame share the reason for the non tactical marking ?




The "decal" as you put it was actually a paper (early) or Vinyl (late) square panel that was issued to units before Reforger or other major exercises. It was commonly taped to the turret or vehicle sides and the front of the glacis, hood or doors. The number identified a numerical specific designation for the unit (other than the units actual designation), and the color of the panel designated the unit as either a member of the "blue" or "orange" army. These were used by umpires and controllers to "officiate" the training. Umpire vehicles used a white panel as I recall (but it's been a while-- so my memory may be a bit faulty here). Depending on where in the world you were and what exercise you might be in, there have been variations in panel sizes and types (triangles and circles have also been used in other locations outside Europe). These number "boxes" were prepared and issued through the Training Aid Support Center (TASC) at the installation or unit level. They were supposed to be collected up after the exercise for future use, but were often just tossed (or kept as a souvenir). Typically, they were attached to the vehicle with "100 Mile an hour" tape --what we know today as OD green duct tape. In later years, strips of Velcro tape have been used to attach both the MILES gear (a laser training aid targeting system) and these panels. "513" would be an identifier for some armored unit (either at company, Troop, Squadron or or Battalion level, and would be used to make assessments in attrition and combat strength during an exercise. Umpires and exercise controllers would keep corresponding score sheets as unit controllers would assess the effects of training simulated action or "events" for opposing units. One common trait of using this "stick on system was that the adhesive on the 100 MPH tape would stick to the vehicle long after the panel was removed, leaving an odd square or rectangle of sticky residue which attracted dirt-- making the area rather distinctive. Hope this helps explain it.
VR, Russ



Thanks Russ for the detail explanation for the color..its to designate which side you are on and for keeping score of exercise...that's good to know..
mikado
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Singapore / 新加坡
Joined: July 10, 2005
KitMaker: 328 posts
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Posted: Sunday, January 13, 2019 - 01:00 PM UTC

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G



Nice..G..do you have any color picture of your build above? Can't tell which scheme its painted..I am going to guess its desert gray ?
iowabrit
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Iowa, United States
Joined: November 06, 2007
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Posted: Sunday, January 13, 2019 - 01:55 PM UTC
The Tankograd 'Reforger' books have some great color pics of MERDC painted vehicles
m75
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California, United States
Joined: July 20, 2002
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Posted: Saturday, January 26, 2019 - 04:06 AM UTC
Looks to be the MERDC desert gray. 2AD in 70s had two BDEs in the verdant green and the third in desert schemes.

Contrary to what I read in some of the passages above, in five years I saw five new tracks (M113s) received in the battalion that were OD upon arrival that were repainted using MERDC, plus one APC that was repainted specifically for a show. Outside of that, I saw no repainting of vehicles on an overall basis, just touchups following repair or component replacement.

I understood the concept of MERDC, especially where the process allowed for shifting seasons by changing the two primary colors, but never saw it put into practice.

And I still think the desert gray is the most attractive color/pattern yet!
AgentG
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Nevada, United States
Joined: December 21, 2008
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Posted: Saturday, January 26, 2019 - 10:54 AM UTC

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G



Nice..G..do you have any color picture of your build above? Can't tell which scheme its painted..I am going to guess its desert gray ?




That's "gray desert" MERDC and that's the only photo of that build I have right now.

I sprayed the base color a custom blend of MM Acryl tans, then hand brushed MM Acryl "Field Drab". The yellow is a 50/50 mix of Vallejo "Sand Yellow" and "Dark Sand". The crows feet are just Vallejo "Black Gray". I just decided to hand brush the camo on this one.

G
mikado
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Singapore / 新加坡
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Posted: Tuesday, January 29, 2019 - 04:25 AM UTC



Thanks G for the color tips for "gray desert"..pretty sure will come in really handy soon...

Anyway...I am not a superstitious person...but weird things do happen when least expected

I completed painting the academy M113 tracks...put in the decal followed by decal softener...outcome was really satisfying...wait a day before I spray a few thin layer of semi-gloss to protect the decal..

Left hand holding the model...right hand opening the door with the semi-gloss rattle can tucked under my right arm pit...and for some unknown reason.. my right hand swing and hit the model..and the model had a hard landing on the floor...shattering the tracks in all direction...

Stood there for 30 second...not sure to laugh or cry...my only consolation was the model landed upright..and only the tracks were damaged and nothing else...

Had to go to LHS to get replacement track..and the only available ones were the AFV club M113 track..The AFV club M113 tracks are not as detail as the Academy..but there wasn't many option for me...I might be bias..but I don't think the AFV club track glue better than the Academy track..and does not look as nice...

Finally..considered these 2 build done...I started this thread in mid Oct'18..and completed both build without weathering in end Jan'19...All in all..about 3.5 months...Next phrase ...weathering will start..not sure how long it will take ...

The one take away that I learnt for these Merdc camo scheme is to test out the color on plastic card before applying to the model itself...cheaper and less time consuming to test the color on plastic card than to build multiple model to test out the color scheme...