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AFV Painting & Weathering
Answers to questions about the right paint scheme or tips for the right effect.
Acrylic weathering?
Phil5000
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New Zealand
Joined: May 13, 2013
KitMaker: 165 posts
Armorama: 135 posts
Posted: Tuesday, March 17, 2020 - 03:58 PM UTC
Hi fellas,

I'd like to get away from using solvent thinners for washes so no enamel or oil products.

I know Vallejo make acrylic weathering washes but I've never tried them. Do you use them the same way as the enamel? Do you have to do the whole model in one go to avoid tide marks? Or can you remove tide marks if you're quick?

I once saw a video, I think it was by Mig and he weathered a panzer three with only water soluble products but I can't find it on youtube. Does anyone know any videos that might help me?

Appreciate any help. Thanks.
DocEvan
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California, United States
Joined: August 09, 2014
KitMaker: 180 posts
Armorama: 180 posts
Posted: Tuesday, March 17, 2020 - 04:06 PM UTC
Tide marks? Do you mean brush marks?

I use acrylics exclusively, and love the Vallejo rust straking set. I just apply the paints with a small brush, or a fine foam rubber makeup applicator. I use the latter in the same way as drybrushing, but in dabbing motion.
There are numerous YouTube videos illustrating various techniques. There is no single right way to weather!


Quoted Text

Hi fellas,

I'd like to get away from using solvent thinners for washes so no enamel or oil products.

I know Vallejo make acrylic weathering washes but I've never tried them. Do you use them the same way as the enamel? Do you have to do the whole model in one go to avoid tide marks? Or can you remove tide marks if you're quick?

I once saw a video, I think it was by Mig and he weathered a panzer three with only water soluble products but I can't find it on youtube. Does anyone know any videos that might help me?

Appreciate any help. Thanks.

PRH001
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New Mexico, United States
Joined: June 16, 2014
KitMaker: 681 posts
Armorama: 603 posts
Posted: Tuesday, March 17, 2020 - 04:57 PM UTC
The video you are trying to find is called Vallejo Acrylics Techniques and is still on YouTube. Hope this helps.

Paul H
Tojo72
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North Carolina, United States
Joined: June 06, 2006
KitMaker: 4,688 posts
Armorama: 3,509 posts
Posted: Tuesday, March 17, 2020 - 11:43 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Tide marks? Do you mean brush marks?

I use acrylics exclusively, and love the Vallejo rust straking set. I just apply the paints with a small brush, or a fine foam rubber makeup applicator. I use the latter in the same way as drybrushing, but in dabbing motion.
There are numerous YouTube videos illustrating various techniques. There is no single right way to weather!


Quoted Text

Hi fellas,

I'd like to get away from using solvent thinners for washes so no enamel or oil products.

I know Vallejo make acrylic weathering washes but I've never tried them. Do you use them the same way as the enamel? Do you have to do the whole model in one go to avoid tide marks? Or can you remove tide marks if you're quick?

I once saw a video, I think it was by Mig and he weathered a panzer three with only water soluble products but I can't find it on youtube. Does anyone know any videos that might help me?

Appreciate any help. Thanks.




Tide marks are different then brush marks,they come when the wash puddles in one place and is allowed to dry,causing tide marks
Dioramartin
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New South Wales, Australia
Joined: May 04, 2016
KitMaker: 1,476 posts
Armorama: 1,463 posts
Posted: Wednesday, March 18, 2020 - 12:32 AM UTC
Hi Phil, as mentioned above there is no single correct method, there are many. Here’s some heresy – my entire paint store consists of 5 tubes of cheap artists’ acrylics as found in any art materials store. Mid-red, mid-yellow, mid-blue, carbon black, titanium white. Every colour & shade in the spectrum right there, total cost say A$50, they’ve lasted at least 6 years and painted/weathered maybe 30 vehicles and counting.

Artists’ acrylics were specifically designed for multiple washes, and to dry faster than oils.

I use brushes – the softer the better (ideally sables or fake sables) with flat heads. For weathering purposes it’s quite hard to get any brushstrokes/tide marks with them anyway, but virtually impossible if you dampen the area to be painted first with a thinly-loaded brush of clean water, and then use dilute paint consistencies plus a tiny dab of Tamiya X21 Flat Base in the mix to eliminate sheen – that additive also reduces surface tension so you don’t get beading.

It’s equally difficult to make a serious mistake - if a wash doesn’t look OK when dry it can usually be corrected by looking at a colour/spectrum wheel to see what the opposite colour is. For example if the result is too green, a very thin over-wash of orangey brown dulls it. If it doesn’t, do successive washes until it does.

GeraldOwens
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Florida, United States
Joined: March 30, 2006
KitMaker: 3,733 posts
Armorama: 3,694 posts
Posted: Wednesday, March 18, 2020 - 10:24 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Tide marks? Do you mean brush marks?



If the water beads up into tiny puddles, the pigment concentrates at the outer edge of the puddle and forms a dirty ring as it dries. If caught early, tide marks can be scrubbed out with a moist brush. The use of flow enhancers or even a tiny drop of dish detergent can break up the surface tension, so the water doesn't bead up.

If you want a more forgiving medium, artist's watercolors can be used for weathering. If you don't like an effect, you can just rinse it off and start over. When you're satisfied, overspray with clear flat to make it permanent.
Phil5000
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New Zealand
Joined: May 13, 2013
KitMaker: 165 posts
Armorama: 135 posts
Posted: Wednesday, March 25, 2020 - 01:46 PM UTC
Thanks fellas. I'm quite relieved as I was concerned I'd have to give up modelling as I hate using the enamel ones due to the fumes. I've found a youtube channel (Laser Creation World) that does the same things I do, tanks and military dios and he uses Vallejo Model Air paints exclusively like you guys and he gets absolutely amazing results.

Thanks the one, Paul. Thanks.
Biggles2
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Quebec, Canada
Joined: January 01, 2004
KitMaker: 7,600 posts
Armorama: 6,110 posts
Posted: Thursday, March 26, 2020 - 06:00 AM UTC
If it's just the oil fumes that bother you there are odorless thinners available, such as this:
https://gamblincolors.com/oil-painting/gamsol/
Many artist supply chains have their own house brand which is cheaper. I make all my weathering with odorless thinner and artist's tube oil paint.