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AFV Painting & Weathering
Answers to questions about the right paint scheme or tips for the right effect.
Drying Artist Oil Paint
210cav
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Virginia, United States
Joined: February 05, 2002
KitMaker: 6,149 posts
Armorama: 4,573 posts
Posted: Sunday, April 05, 2020 - 09:32 AM UTC
I am new to using artist oil paint. I used some raw sienna on a figure to see the results. Impressive colors, but after two days the paint is still tacky. I would appreciate some advice on how to use this type paint.
Many thanks
DJ
smydi01
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Scotland, United Kingdom
Joined: October 14, 2009
KitMaker: 219 posts
Armorama: 197 posts
Posted: Sunday, April 05, 2020 - 10:25 AM UTC
Hi

They do take a while to dry that's true.
The following link may help.

https://www.winsornewton.com/na/discover/tips-and-techniques/oil-colour/understanding-the-drying-times-for-oil-colour-us
dhines
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Nova Scotia, Canada
Joined: November 17, 2015
KitMaker: 407 posts
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Posted: Sunday, April 05, 2020 - 03:40 PM UTC
I use Windsor and Newton oils,start by putting your colors on a piece of cardboard and let it set for at least 45 minutes. This will draw out some of the excess oil and speed up drying time. Some people will let the painted figure sit under a light to help dry. I use a hair dryer sometimes on figures and always on vehicles when weathering them.Best regards..........Dale
PanzerKarl
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England - North West, United Kingdom
Joined: April 20, 2004
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Posted: Sunday, April 05, 2020 - 05:51 PM UTC
Use thin layers.
Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 3,670 posts
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Posted: Sunday, April 05, 2020 - 06:38 PM UTC
There are easier ways to dry oil paints than just waiting for it to dry. As mentioned above, you can leech some of the linseed oil out of the paint by letting it sit on a piece of cardboard for several hours. Japan dryer is a solvent that can be mixed with some oils which will speed the drying process. In addition, depending on what you are doing with the oils, Turpenoid Light mixed or blended with the oils will speed up drying to several hours or overnight. (I like to use the dot filter method, then I blend with turpenoid light, and usually everything is dry in 12 hours). You can also mix oils with standard mineral spirits, or lacquer thinner (but this is not recommended over enamel paints if you’re using the oils for extensive weathering). Lacquer thinner should be reserved for use over fully cured lacquers or acrylic lacquers. Finally, one of my favorite techniques for getting oils to dry almost instantly is to give them a coat of Testors Dullcoat— this dries the oil almost immediately. However, I always give any oil (or other paint for that matter) a full 24 hours to cure.
VR, Russ
oldbean
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Virginia, United States
Joined: July 05, 2004
KitMaker: 769 posts
Armorama: 461 posts
Posted: Monday, April 06, 2020 - 01:33 AM UTC
I use Windsor and Newton paints. I mix a little of Windsor and Newon's Liquin in with the paint before applying to whatever I'm painting. This helps to thin the paint a little and also it dries overnight.
Jesse
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MODELGEEK
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Scotland, United Kingdom
Joined: June 08, 2015
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Posted: Monday, April 06, 2020 - 03:00 AM UTC
when I paint flesh tones using oils, I then put the figures into a nice warm airing cupboard in the house and come back to them the following weekend.
210cav
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Virginia, United States
Joined: February 05, 2002
KitMaker: 6,149 posts
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Posted: Monday, April 06, 2020 - 03:37 AM UTC
Guys-- your recommendations are why we ask questions on this forum. I deeply appreciate your responsiveness and the depth of understanding you have on the subject matter.
Thank you all for replying
DJ