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AFV Painting & Weathering
Answers to questions about the right paint scheme or tips for the right effect.
Washing with oils
drewgimpy
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Utah, United States
Joined: January 24, 2002
KitMaker: 835 posts
Armorama: 388 posts
Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2002 - 02:39 PM UTC
I have tried washing with oils on figures with some mixed results. I am using black oil paint and thining with terpenoid. It seems like the 2 items never really mix together well. The oil paint settles to the bottom when I mix them. I like the way that the mix stays in the cracks and disperses on the model, but it seems like there is no consistancy in how dark it is because the oil always settles in the jar I mix it in and comes out different each time I dip the brush in. I mix it up each time but there is still some differencnes it seems. Am I not using enough oil maybe or am I thinning with the wrong stuff? I have read about how awsome oils are for washing but I am about to go back to enamels. I would be grateful for any advice.
Tin_Can
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Florida, United States
Joined: January 26, 2002
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Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2002 - 07:05 PM UTC
I've just started messing around with oil washes myself recently and have good luck mising oil paint with odorless mineral spirits.
tankshack
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Virginia, United States
Joined: January 30, 2002
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Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2002 - 08:16 PM UTC

Quoted Text

The oil paint settles to the bottom when I mix them. I like the way that the mix stays in the cracks and disperses on the model, but it seems like there is no consistancy in how dark it is because the oil always settles in the jar I mix it in and comes out different each time I dip the brush in.



The key to a consistent mix for the wash is to not use a jar. A really cheap and easy way to do it is to put a ziploc bag over an index card or scrap of cardboard. Then you can mix up the wash on the plastic... Just layout a pea size dollop of the oil paint and then use a straw or eyedropper to add thinner... now you'll be in complete control of the consistency of the wash... and be able to experience with different "depths" or "shades" of the wash...

I also use a common item from the art store... water color palletes... you can pick them up for less than a buck.. and you'll have six or eight mixing dishes...

Later,
Tim
ArmouredSprue
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South Australia, Australia
Joined: January 09, 2002
KitMaker: 1,958 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2002 - 09:35 PM UTC
There are, also, oil like painting designed to be soluble in water, itīs odorless and can be thinned both with water or alchool.
HTH
screamingeagle
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Connecticut, United States
Joined: January 08, 2002
KitMaker: 1,027 posts
Armorama: 595 posts
Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2002 - 10:41 PM UTC
Hi Drew.
I myself do not like this turpenoid stuff.
What i use is a good Distilled English Turpentine - i don't get that gummy
residue like with "Gum Turpentine".
Once in a while i even use regular Testors Enamel Thinner. ( NOT AIRBRUSH THINNER )
Also like the guy's said, you are better off using a palette for mixing paint.
- ralph
Epi
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Texas, United States
Joined: December 22, 2001
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Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2002 - 10:50 PM UTC
Definatley us Mineral Spirits or regular Turpintine. I use regular Turpintine and I had no problems like you say.
Heres another sugestion for you DREW. Have you thought of using Acrylics for you figures. Of course stay with oils for the flesh, but maybe try using paints like Vellajo or Andrea. I use Vellajo and they are great!!!!!!!!!!!!! Just a thought.
drewgimpy
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Utah, United States
Joined: January 24, 2002
KitMaker: 835 posts
Armorama: 388 posts
Posted: Wednesday, February 20, 2002 - 03:10 AM UTC
Thanks for the help guys. It looks like I need to get a different thinner. On my figures I only use the oil for the flesh, I use enamels or acrylics for the rest. I use model master for both and seem to work well for me. It aslo looks like I need to use more paint. I was adding about as much paint as I was with enamels and it looks like oils need a bit more. One more trip to the art store, my wife will be thrilled! I will be gone for a few days but will check back in and let everyone know how it worked out for me.
GeneralFailure
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European Union
Joined: February 15, 2002
KitMaker: 2,289 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, February 20, 2002 - 04:51 AM UTC
Drew,
I wash with turpentine and oil paint, but I noticed some brands of oil paint leave more residu, while others mix better. Oddly, it's the cheapest artist oil color (a few Euro for a 20-color box of tubes) that works best. I tried with humbrol oil paint and turpentine, but that did not work so well.

In the beginning I did this with black, too. Now I use rusty or brownish colors. Looks good.

I also give a wash with the stuff (even with some residue) around the gas tank AFTER the final flat coat is applied to a model. That gives a realistic look. Looks a bit more shiny, like a real fuel leak...

Take care, look forward till you're back from the hospital

drewgimpy
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Utah, United States
Joined: January 24, 2002
KitMaker: 835 posts
Armorama: 388 posts
Posted: Wednesday, March 13, 2002 - 12:07 PM UTC
I wanted to post a quick update. I switched from terpnoid to mineral spirits and found it works much better. I also added more oil pant to the mix and that helped. Much more paint is needed with oils that with enamels when washing, at least thats what I have found.

My next step in trying to improve the process will be to add a lair of future to the model before I wash with oils. The mix sometimes spread out of the groves a little becuase of the rough flat finish (at least thats what it appears). I will try that in the next time and post the results.

Anyway, thanks again for the tips. They helped a bunch